Jataka Tale Summaries #261-280

Paduma Jataka (#261)

The Bodhisatta was once a young son of a wealthy merchant. His brothers unsuccessfully tried to sweet-talk a deformed man into giving them lotuses by saying his nose would grow back if he did. The Bodhisatta just asked politely and honestly and was given some.

Mudu-Pani Jataka (#262)

The Bodhisatta was once a king. His daughter and his nephew, the crown prince, were in love but the Bodhisatta did not want them to marry. He kept close watch over his daughter, but the loving couple tricked him and got away to elope. The Bodhisatta forgave them.

Culla-Palobhana Jataka (#263)

The Bodhisatta was once an ascetic. From an infant to his teenage years, he could not even look at a woman. His father, the king wanted his son to be normal, so had one of his dancing girls seduce him. She was successful and he got so crazy in love that he threatened people if they even came near this woman. He was banished to the wilderness where he realized the errors of his ways and renounced the world to live alone.

Maha-Panada Jataka (#264)

(Duplicate of Jataka #489) The Bodhisatta was once Indra, king of the gods. After a king was unable to conceive a child of his own, the Bodhisatta gave him a son. Later, when this prince was going to replace his father on the throne, the Bodhisatta sent a dancer from heaven to make him smile during his long, extravagant coronation ceremony.

Khurappa Jataka (#265)

The Bodhisatta was once a forester. While working as a guide to lead a merchant’s caravan through the forest he single-handedly fought off a large band of robbers because being the hero to protect them was his duty.

Vatagga-Sindhava Jataka (#266)

The Bodhisatta was once a king’s state horse. A donkey fell in love at first sight with the Bodhisatta and when they met for the first time, she kicked him in the jaw so as not to appear cheap and easy. The Bodhisatta never returned and she was depressed.

Kakkata Jataka (#267)

The Bodhisatta was once an elephant. One time the Bodhisatta was in the clutches of a giant crab that ate elephants. As the crab was about to kill the Bodhisatta, his wife flattered it and this distraction allowed the Bodhisatta to stomp it to death.

Arama-Dusa Jataka (#268)

(Duplicate of Jataka #46) The Bodhisatta was once a wise and respected man. The king’s gardener asked the monkeys living in the royal park to water plants for him. To conserve water they pulled up the plants to see the size of their roots to give them the appropriate amount. The Bodhisatta saw this and said ignorant people who desire to do good end up doing harm.

Sujata Jataka (#269)

The Bodhisatta was once a king. His mother was a cruel, harsh woman. He got her to change her manner by explaining that people hated beautiful blue jays and loved ugly cuckoos because of their voices.

Uluka Jataka (#270)

The Bodhisatta was once a goose. The birds had decided to make an owl their king, but a crow objected because owls have perpetually angry faces. So the birds chose the Bodhisatta instead and crows and owls became enemies.

Udapana-Dusaka Jataka (#271)

The Bodhisatta was once an ascetic. Each night a jackal fouled the camp’s well and when some of the other ascetics caught it, the jackal said it was their nature to do this. The Bodhisatta told him to never return.

Vyaggha Jataka (#272)

The Bodhisatta was once a tree fairy. A neighboring tree fairy ignored the Bodhisatta’s advice and chased away the lion and tiger that lived in their forest. With the danger gone, humans came and cut down all the trees.

Kacchapa Jataka (#273)

The Bodhisatta was once an ascetic. While the Buddha meditated, a mischievous monkey would come and ejaculate in his ear. One time the monkey stuck his penis in a turtle’s mouth and it bit down hard. The suffering monkey picked up the turtle and ran to the Bodhisatta for help. He joked that the monkey looked like a greedy brahmin holding a full alms bowl and then told the turtle to release his bite as their marriage was now consummated.

Lola Jataka (#274)

(Duplicate of Jataka #42) The Bodhisatta was once a pigeon. A greedy crow wanted to eat fish from the kitchen where the Bodhisatta lived, so he befriended him and moved in. The Bodhisatta knew the crow’s intention and told him not to do it, but the crow didn’t listen. When he tried to steal some fish he was caught, defeathered, and killed.

Rucira Jataka (#275)

(Duplicate of Jataka #42) The Bodhisatta was once a pigeon. A greedy crow wanted to eat fish from the kitchen where the Bodhisatta lived, so he befriended him and moved in. The Bodhisatta knew the crow’s intention and told him not to do it, but the crow didn’t listen. When he tried to steal some fish he was caught, defeathered, and killed.

Kurudhamma Jataka (#276)

The Bodhisatta was once a king. He and everyone in the palace faithfully followed the five virtues, agonizing over tiny transgressions such as the Bodhisatta shooting an arrow over a lake where it could have killed a fish when it landed, and so his kingdom thrived. Another kingdom did not, and so suffered drought and famine. When the other king began to live like the Bodhisatta, the rains returned.

Romaka Jataka (#277)

The Bodhisatta was once a pigeon. He paid respect to an ascetic living nearby, but after a villager served the ascetic pigeon meat he wanted to eat more and tried unsuccessfully to kill the Bodhisatta.

Mahisa Jataka (#278)

The Bodhisatta was once a buffalo. A rude monkey used to defecate on his back and the merciful Bodhisatta let it happen. But later, as the Bodhisatta predicted, the monkey did it to another buffalo, who then killed him.

Satapatta Jataka (#279)

The Bodhisatta was once a thief. A woman who reincarnated as a jackal tried to stop her human son from getting robbed, but he could not understand her howls. And he thought the sound of a crane was good luck, when it really told the Bodhisatta to rob and kill him.

Puta-Dusaka Jataka (#280)

The Bodhisatta was once a householder. One day he saw a monkey destroying the leaves that a gardener was collecting. This being the nature of monkeys, the Bodhisatta noted that it was acting both proper and improper at the same time.

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