Jataka Tale Summaries #41-60

Losaka Jataka (#41)

The Bodhisatta was once a teacher. Long before this, a monk grew jealous of another and discarded food that he was tasked with delivering to him. As punishment, the monk was reborn as a poor child who was abandoned by his family. He was given a place in the Bodhisatta’s charity school, but was kicked out for bad behavior. His misfortune continued for many years until finally he was arrested and the Bodhisatta saved him from punishment by taking him on as a slave.

Kapota Jataka (#42)

The Bodhisatta was once a pigeon. A greedy crow wanted to eat fish from the kitchen where the Bodhisatta lived, so he befriended him and moved in. The Bodhisatta knew the crow’s intention and told him not to do it, but the crow didn’t listen. When he tried to steal some fish, he was caught and killed.

Veluka Jataka (#43)

The Bodhisatta was once an ascetic. One of his students kept a pet snake, and the Bodhisatta warned him that someday it would kill him. But the student loved the snake and did not let it go. Soon after, the snake bit the student, and he died.

Makasa Jataka (#44)

The Bodhisatta was once a merchant. A mosquito bit a carpenter on the head, and he told his son to swat it away. The boy hit the mosquito with an axe, killing his father. The Bodhisatta told those around him that smart enemies are better than stupid friends.

Rohini Jataka (#45)

The Bodhisatta was once a royal treasurer. The mother of one of his slaves asked her daughter to shoo away some flies. Without thinking, she hit one with her pestle and accidentally killed her mother. The Bodhisatta told those around him that smart enemies are better than stupid friends.

Aramadusaka Jataka (#46)

The Bodhisatta was once a wise and respected man. The king’s gardener asked the monkeys living in the royal park to water trees for him. To conserve water, they pulled up the trees to see the size of their roots so they could give them the appropriate amount. The Bodhisatta saw this and said ignorant people who desire to do good end up doing harm.

Varuni Jataka (#47)

The Bodhisatta was once a royal treasurer. An apprentice tavernkeeper saw that customers liked to eat salt before drinking, so he put some in the grog, ruining the whole batch and angering the customers. The Bodhisatta said this was an example of how ignorant people who desire to do good end up doing harm.

Vedabbha Jataka (#48)

The Bodhisatta was once a student. His teacher knew a spell that caused treasure to rain from the sky. Bandits captured the two, and the teacher cast the spell to pay the ransom. But when captured by a second gang, he could not cast his spell again, leading all the bandits to fight each other. Everybody died except the Bodhisatta, who took the treasure and gave it to the poor.

Nakkhatta Jataka (#49)

The Bodhisatta was once a wise and respected man. Some townsfolk had arranged a marriage to a country girl and set a date with her family. Then they asked an ascetic if the day was lucky, and he said no. So the family stayed home on the chosen day, and the bride’s family gave her away to another man. The townsfolk went the next day, and the Bodhisatta told them that consulting the stars is a foolish habit.

Dummedha Jataka (#50)

The Bodhisatta was once a king. The people of his city sacrificed animals to the gods, and he schemed to stop this. He lied that he had vowed to a tree fairy that he would offer the flesh of one thousand subjects who did bad things. After this, nobody ever broke the precepts again.

Mahasilava Jataka (#51)

The Bodhisatta was once a king. A former advisor that the Bodhisatta had expelled convinced a rival king to conquer him because, in order to avoid any deaths, the Bodhisatta would not resist. Buried up to his neck to be eaten by jackals, the Bodhisatta managed to escape and this convinced the invading king it was a mistake to conquer a man as virtuous as the Bodhisatta. So he returned to his own kingdom.

Cula-Janaka Jataka (#52)

(Duplicate of Jataka #539) The Bodhisatta was once a widowed queen’s son. She fled to safety after her king died in battle. When the Bodhisatta came of age, he set off to his father’s city to make himself king. His boat sank, and a goddess rescued him and took him to the kingdom, where he was given the throne. After a long reign, the destruction of a mango tree inspired him to become an ascetic.

Punnapati Jataka (#53)

The Bodhisatta was once a royal treasurer. Some men invited him to drink liquor, and he assumed it was a ruse to rob him. To expose them, he agreed to join them later. When he returned, their bowls were still full (if it was good liquor, they would have drank some) so he knew that his suspicions were right.

Phala Jataka (#54)

The Bodhisatta was once a merchant. During a caravan trip, some of his men ignored his advice and ate a poisonous fruit that looked exactly like a mango. The Bodhisatta saved their lives with an elixir. His knowledge impressed locals who normally took the property of people who died after eating the fruit.

Pancavudha Jataka (#55)

The Bodhisatta was once a crown prince. While traveling home one time, he encountered a fearsome ogre and tried to kill him, but was unable because his weapons could not penetrate his shaggy fur. But the ogre, impressed by the Bodhisatta’s bravery, decided not to kill him. He then preached to the ogre, who gave up his evil ways.

Kancanakkhandha Jataka (#56)

The Bodhisatta was once a farmer. One day his plow struck a giant gold bar. He couldn’t lift it, so he cut it into four pieces and carried each to his home.

Vanarinda Jataka (#57)

The Bodhisatta was once a monkey. Every day he hopped onto a lone rock to reach an island full of fruit. When a crocodile who wanted to eat the Bodhisatta sat on the rock, he got across the river safely by convincing it to close its eyes, and then jumping on its head.

Tayodhamma Jataka (#58)

The Bodhisatta was once a monkey. The king of his troop feared being overthrown, so he castrated all newborn males. When the Bodhisatta’s mother got pregnant by the king, she fled. When the Bodhisatta reached adulthood he went to see his father. The king twice tried to kill the Bodhisatta, but failed, and he became the new king.

Bherivada Jataka (#59)

The Bodhisatta was once a village drummer. While traveling through a forest he told his son not to play his drum continuously or it would attract thieves. But his son did not listen, and they got robbed.

Samkhadhamana Jataka (#60)

The Bodhisatta was once a village conch-blower. While traveling through a forest, he told his father not to blow his conch continuously or it would attract thieves. But his father did not listen, and they got robbed.

previous arrow                next arrow

1‑2021‑40,  41‑60,  61‑8081‑100101‑120121‑140141‑160161‑180181‑200201‑220221‑240241‑260261‑280281‑300301‑320321‑340341‑360361‑380381‑400401‑420421‑440441‑460461‑480481‑500501‑520521‑537538‑547

Share this page.