Kacchapa Jataka (#273)

The Bodhisatta was once an ascetic. He lived alone in the Himalayas and while sitting in meditation in his leaf hut, a mischievous, horrible monkey would come and ejaculate in his ear. But being blissfully calm, the Bodhisatta was not disturbed and did not stop it. One time the monkey saw a turtle sunning itself with its mouth open and he stuck his penis in it. The turtle bit down hard and the monkey was in agony. He realized only the Bodhisatta could end his suffering and he lifted up the turtle with both hands and went to see him.

It looked like the monkey was holding an alms bowl, so the Bodhisatta jokingly asked, “Who are you, a brahmin? Where did you go to collect so much food?” implying he was greedy. The monkey replied, “I’m just a foolish monkey who touched something I shouldn’t have. Set me free and I will go away.” The Bodhisatta replied, “The marriage between your clans has been consummated: Turtle, you can stop having sex now.” The turtle, on hearing the Bodhisatta’s words, released its grip and the monkey did the same. They both showed respect to the Bodhisatta and left, the monkey running far away, never to return.

In the Lifetime of the Buddha

The monkey and the turtle were earlier births of two high-ranking royal military officers who hated each other and spoke rudely every time they met. Neither the king nor their friends and family could set them right. One day the Buddha divined that these two men were close to having a spiritual breakthrough, so the next morning he went out collecting alms at each of their houses. While sitting with them, the Buddha preached about loving-kindness and dharma so clearly they both became disciples. The two soldiers forgave each other and were harmonious from then on.

Later, when the Buddha heard some of his disciples discussing how he had humbled the two soldiers, he told them this story so they knew he had also reconciled the same two men in the past.

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