Gutha-Pana Jataka (#227)

The Bodhisatta was once a tree fairy, and he saw the following occur. A dung beetle walked past a caravan way station out in the border region and drank some liquor spilled on the ground. He was drunk when he returned to his lump of dung to sleep. The dung was still a bit moist, and when he lied down on it the dung gave way. He thought this happened because of his own great strength. At that very moment an angry elephant walking by smelled the dung, and turned around in disgust. But the impaired dung beetle believed it had fled in fear of him and challenged it to a fight. The elephant came back saying, “I will not fight you with my feet hands, or tusks. I will use what is appropriate for you: dung.” And then he dropped a large dung ball on the beetle and urinated on him too. The dung beetle died.

In the Lifetime of the Buddha

The dung beetle was an earlier birth of an obnoxious lout who used to bother the Buddha’s disciples so much when they went collecting morning alms that they stopped going to his village. One day a disciple (he was the elephant in an earlier birth) asked about that village, and when told about the insufferable man there, he said he would stop him from pestering people. When this man saw the disciple he rushed up and started asking questions, but the disciple told him he would not answer until after he finished collecting alms. The man waited and when the disciple was done, he led the man outside the village. When he asked his first question, the disciple hit him in the head, knocked him to the ground, beat him, threw dirt in his face, and told him that if he ever asked another disciple a question he would come back and do it again. After this, the man fled any time he saw one of the Buddha’s disciples.

When the Buddha heard some disciples discussing this incident he told them this story so they knew the pair had a similar encounter in the past.

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